Cultural Barbarians

I was getting ready to post something on the D&D Beyond forums about rage-less barbarians when it struck me that I was approaching the idea from the wrong angle. Instead of taking away a Barbarians Rage, let’s re-frame the concept of “barbarian”.

What makes a Barbarian?

Or Everybody’s So Mad!

Taking a look back down the interwebs, (and a short trip down memory lane, yes I am that old), we see that Barbarians were not introduced to D&D with much more flair than the Ranger. Just look at the Unearthed Arcana entry for them. What I see in the list of skills and abilities are the precursors (not direct translations) for the current iteration of barbarian attributes:

  • Back Protection => Danger Sense
  • Climb, Hide in Natural Surroundings => Current Skills list
  • Surprise => Feral Instinct
  • Leaping and Springing => Fast Movement

Somewhere in there we lost the Illusion detection and fear of magic. Oh well.

However ever since those kits in 2e, with 3e making it official the defining feature of a Barbarian is Rage.

Taken straight from the current SRD:

These barbarians, different as they might be, are defined by their rage: unbridled, unquenchable, and unthinking fury. More than a mere emotion, their anger is the ferocity of a cornered predator, the unrelenting assault of a storm, the churning turmoil of the sea. (…) For every barbarian, rage is a power that fuels not just a battle frenzy but also uncanny reflexes, resilience, and feats of strength.

The error in this thinking is that paints a broad scope picture of a people as rage-machines. A society peopled solely by Incredible Hulks would not last very long. I put forth that what we cal the Barbarian class is in actuality a Berserker. It is a specific role within barbarian society but not representative of Barbarians as a whole.

So what does this mean? How to apply that thinking to enable deeper breadth in your barbarians?

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Treat the Barbarian Class as just that: a class, a single aspect of the Barbarian culture. I prefer to call it a Berserker or Rager. That leaves me free to culturally use any of the other classes as Barbarians as well. All it takes is a little re-skinning.

If you want to create a Barbarian culture take a look at what makes them “barbarians”. This often implies a lack a civilization but I encourage you to simply have it be different than the prevailing society. Barbarians have their own customs and traditions and philosophies and education systems. That it covers different topics or diverges from “our” reasoning doesn’t mean it is less valuable/meaningful, just different.

Barbarians or often portrayed as savage, ignorant brutes but this isb308a96eeb3256b3cc8cf8e781ac73e7 too easy a trap to fall into. We are holding barbarians to our (unequal) standards. Think of it this way: Compare ourselves to humans 100 years ago.

We might consider ourselves to be smarter and more enlightened but  just over 100 years ago we had Nikola Tesla and Thomas Edison fighting it out in the War of Currents. They were masters of their technology. Expose them to our tech and they would be able to master and further it (hell they started and foresaw some of it).

 

 

Classy Barbarians

Having a Barbarian “culture” or society allows you a lot of leeway. You are now free to play any of the other classes and re-skin them into your barbarian civilization! In general I would say this means limiting their resources or available technology until they encounter it in their travels but really you can make it mean whatever you want. Let’s take a look at a few examples.

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Bards – Barbarian tribes have strong oral traditions. In addition to or in place of instruments they could chant or sing or perhaps tell stories. That sounds a pretty fascinating to me actually.

 

Clerics/Druids – Clerics and Druids could very easily be recast as shaman or seers. Use local materials in place of the heavy metal armors. Consider multiple Gods/Spirits in place of traditional deities.

Fighter – Not much needs to change here. Use different materials for heavy armor equivalents or perhaps restrict them until further adventuring takes place. The key difference is that here is a barbarian warrior that is not a Rage-machine. This makes “traditional barbarians” take the specific role of “berserker”.

Monk – diablo-iii-the-monk-f-360x360Barbarians are just a likely to have traditional hand/fist martial arts. “Fight with what you have”. I would probably change the flavor from the serene, meditative monastery to a raucous field of barbs learning the most efficient ways to attack each other without weapons.

 

Paladin – Apart from limiting or re-flavoring gear as you did for the fighter not much needs to change. A paladin could be a crusader or an avenger born to protect the tribe or hunt down fiends. A holy warrior is not defined by his plate mail. It is his devotion, his zealotry his willingness to do what his God requires of him.

Ranger/Rogue – The close scoutrelationship to nature that barbarians already have makes this an easy substitution. The gear and equipment doesn’t change much. Rogue/Scouts could join rangers as infiltrators and protectors of the tribe. Ranger/Beastmasters are a pretty typical barbarian trope.

Sorcerer/Warlock/Wizard – Barbarians initially were written with a fear of magic but since that has changed they are free to have tribal spell-casters. Again, call them seers, witches, warlocks whatever fits the flavor.

The dark hut, secluded from the others, with rancid smells or fearful noises. Most other barbarians in the tribe avoid it and its inhabitant, but be assured they are glad he is there. Wizards might need to forgo the idea of colleges of study but can learn under the tutelage of their master or masters.

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These are a few ideas deliberately wide-ranging and vague so you can plug in whatever details you want that make sense for your character in your world. Work with your DM or your players to find the details that fit your characters and give you a wider range of options to make your (insert character class here) barbaric.

 

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Religion in Dungeon and Dragons

Polytheism in D&D

Just what does it mean to live in a world with more than one God? In our very real world we struggle with the concept of one God versus many versus God having multiple manifestations. I’m not here to discuss real world religious doctrine or faiths (though that is a favorite topic).

For the purposes of many D&D and RPG game worlds there are many Gods present in the world. Think of the Greek or Roman pantheons we learned about in school. One God rules over one aspect of the world or perhaps many but not everything. “God of the Seas? You bet! But uh, I can’t do anything about your crops drying up…go ask her.” This means there is a great deal of diversity for players to choose from and almost endless role-playing and flavor potential.

In my experience however each character still acts as though only one God truly matters: their particular God. In fact many characters don’t acknowledge the gods at all. This I think, is a problem.

Let’s explore this from the perspective of the characters shall we?

There is an adventurer, lets say a fighter. A mercenary. She travels the world selling her sword-arm to the highest bidder. While in the north she meets a shaman able to speak with the dead! While in the south she faces a priest of the Sun God able to call down columns of fire on his enemies! During her time as a pirate (you know it) the ships cleric calls on the favor of the Sea Goddess to grant her the ability to breathe water and she swims to the hull of an enemy vessel and bores it full of holes!

All of these are actual events the character experienced and benefited from. Factual evidence of the existence and power of the Gods!  She personally experienced the power of all of them. How can the character in question support the existence and power of only one of these Gods?

She cannot. Each deity is as real to her as the other. So my main question in this: How  does a character worship in a world with multiple Gods? A la carte.

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They worship all of them in the situations that require it. About to cross the sea? Pray to that Sea Goddess. Pray fervently. Entering a maze/dungeon? Pray to the finder of lost souls. Each God or Goddess has a place and a role and the characters in that world must honor that. Yes a warrior would serve the God of Battle first and foremost, but he would pray to The Mother to watch over his family while he is away, to the Lord of Storms for favorable battle conditions and so on.

Now even if they are not your favored deity they are a deity and they demand worship. To use a D&D example look at what happens when Tanis encounters just the slightest shadow of Takhisis in the DragonLance novels. He kneels. She is the epitome of evil, the very thing he is fighting against and even the slightest, the weakest version of her demands his respect. He bows before her.

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So what’s the point? I think we as players are missing out on a huge role-play opportunity. Devoting oneself to one particular God does not negate the Godhood of the other deities, merely how you interact with them and their followers.

DM’s: encourage your players to utilize religion beyond the God the Cleric or Paladin follows. A rogue  or fighter or barbarian will have just as much need for divine guidance as a cleric.

Players: Think about how your character views religion? Are they religious? Very much so or a bit of a Sunday morning Paladin? Do they devote themselves to one God or keep their options open?

Let me know how it goes. I love hearing and sharing stories of our games.